Teacher Loan Forgiveness Program (TLFP) FAQ

No, only full-time teachers qualify for forgiveness under the TLFP.

The chief administrative officer is the official who has access to employment records that establish your eligibility for loan forgiveness in accordance with the requirements explained on the Teacher Loan Forgiveness Application, and who’s authorized to verify your qualifying employment at a school or by an educational service agency. Depending on your employer, the chief administrative officer may be a human resources official, principal, assistant principal, district superintendent, or other school or educational service agency official.

You can request a forbearance by completing a Teacher Loan Forgiveness Forbearance Form and sending it to your loan holder. Your loan holder is required to grant this forbearance if the loan holder believes that the maximum forgiveness amount you’re seeking will pay off your loan balance in full at the end of your teaching service.

No. The forgiveness applies only to any outstanding balance at the end of the five-year period of qualifying service. If you see that you have a low balance, it’s advantageous for you to request a forbearance while you are performing your teaching service, to help you maximize your forgiveness benefit.

Yes. Visit the Annual Directory of Designated Low-Income Schools for Teacher Cancellation Benefits to access a list of all the qualifying schools and locations. Be aware that the list of qualifying schools and locations changes each year, and a school may be considered low-income one year but not the next.

No, you may not receive benefits under both the Teacher Loan Forgiveness Program and the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program for the same teaching service. The same holds true for benefits received through the AmeriCorps Program under Subtitle D of Title I of the National and Community Service Act of 1990. In either case, you would be required to complete separate, non-overlapping periods of teaching service for each respective program.

The Teacher Loan Forgiveness Program (TLFP) is a program that Congress created in response to existing and anticipated teacher shortages. Congress limited the range of borrowers to encourage new people to enter into and continue working in the teaching profession.

No. Unfortunately, you must have borrowed your first FFELP or FDLP loan after October 1, 1998, or you must have paid off any FFELP or FDLP loan you borrowed on or before October 1, 1998, before you borrowed a new loan after October 1, 1998 (and meet other applicable eligibility criteria) to qualify for teacher loan forgiveness.